Bronsted acid ionic liquid-catalyzed reductive Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indoles and cyclic ketones without using an external reductant

Green Chem., 2015, Advance Article
DOI: 10.1039/C4GC01299B, Communication
Amir Taheri, Bingbing Lai, Cheng Cheng, Yanlong Gu
C3-cycloalkylated indole was synthesized from indole and cyclic ketone in the absence of a reductant with the aid of an acid catalyst.
Bronsted acid ionic liquid-catalyzed reductive Friedel-Crafts alkylation of indoles and cyclic ketones without using an external reductant
In the absence of an external reductant, C3-cycloalkylated indole could be synthesized through reductive alkylation of indole with cyclic ketone using a sulfonyl-functionalized Brønsted acid ionic liquid as a catalyst. Water generated in the initial stage of the reaction played a key role in rendering the reductive coupling possible. The reaction proceeds most likely in a radical way.
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Microwave-Assisted Three-Component “Catalyst and Solvent-Free” Green Protocol: A Highly Efficient and Clean One-Pot Synthesis of Tetrahydrobenzo[b]pyrans,

Green Chemistry International

851924.sch.001
Scheme 1: Synthesis of 4H-benzo[b]pyran derivatives under MW irradiation.

Microwave-Assisted Three-Component “Catalyst and Solvent-Free” Green Protocol: A Highly Efficient and Clean One-Pot Synthesis of Tetrahydrobenzo[b]pyrans,

Organic Chemistry International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 851924, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/851924

Sougata Santra, Matiur Rahman, Anupam Roy, Adinath Majee, and Alakananda Hajra
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 851924, 8 pages

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/oci/2014/851924/

A green and highly efficient method has been developed for the one-pot synthesis of tetrahydrobenzo[b]pyrans via a three-component condensation of aldehydes, 1,3-cyclic diketones, and malononitrile under MW irradiation without using any catalyst and solvent. This transformation presumably occurs by a sequential Knoevenagel condensation, Michael addition, and intramolecular cyclization. Operational simplicity, solvent and catalyst-free conditions, the compatibility with various functional groups, nonchromatographic purification technique, and high yields are the notable advantages of this procedure.

851924.sch.002
Scheme 2: Plausible reaction mechanism.
851924.sch.003

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Synthesis of Ibuprofen Using Silica-Supported Preyssler Nanoparticles as an Eco-Friendly, Inexpensive, and Efficient Catalyst,

New Drug Approvals

906801.sch.001
Scheme 1: Synthesis of ibuprofen using Silica-Supported Preyssler Nanoparticles (H14[NaP5W30O110]/SiO2) (SPNPs) using ethanol and pyridine in their reactions.

Synthesis of Ibuprofen Using Silica-Supported Preyssler Nanoparticles as an Eco-Friendly, Inexpensive, and Efficient Catalyst,

Organic Chemistry International
Volume 2014 (2014), Article ID 906801, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/906801

http://www.hindawi.com/journals/oci/2014/906801/

Ali Gharib,1,2 Nader Noroozi Pesyan,3 Leila Vojdani Fard,4 and Mina Roshani1

1Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Mashhad, Iran
2Agricultural Researches and Services Center, Mashhad, Iran
3Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Urmia University, Urmia 57159, Iran
4Education Organization of Razavi Khorasan, Education Ministry, Mashhad, Iran
Received 5 January 2014; Revised 15 February 2014; Accepted 31 March 2014; Published 6 May 2014
Academic Editor: Jonathan White

Copyright © 2014 Ali Gharib et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any…

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I did not run away from a NaCN Exotherm

New Drug Approvals

Deltamethrin

DELTAMETHRIN

DID NOT RUN AWAY FROM NACN ie sodium cyanide EXOTHERM

ALMOST VIRTUAL ACCIDENT AT RPG LIFESCIENCES (SEARLE) PANOLI GUJARAT INDIA 1999-2000

DELTAMETHRIN PROJECT, 1999-2000 Panoli Gujarat India

ww were trying to add acid chloride into an aldehyde at zero degrees cent using PTC conditions and one of ingredient was sodium cyanide, cooling was done by brine

We  Did not run away when instead of adding acid chloride in 2 hrs the operator added it on 10 min…………..I waited at the reactor and controlled an exotherm in plant by switching off brine supply to other reactors,

The reaction got controlled at 59 deg cent and luckily was ok…………the exotherm was fearful.

Despite all odds God saves us

http://makeinindia.com/ MAKE IN INDIA
http://makeinindia.com/
http://makeinindia.com/sector/pharmaceuticals/

ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO

THANKS AND REGARD’S
DR ANTHONY MELVIN CRASTO Ph.D

amcrasto@gmail.com

MOBILE-+91 9323115463
GLENMARK SCIENTIST ,  INDIA
web link

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A truly green synthesis of α-aminonitriles via Strecker reaction

Green Chemistry International

A truly green synthesis of α-aminonitriles via Strecker reaction

Debasish Bandyopadhyay, Juliana M Velazquez, Bimal K BanikOrganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters 2011, 1:11 (4 October 2011)

Background
The classical Strecker reaction is one of the simplest and most economical methods for the synthesis of racemic α-aminonitriles (precursor of α-amino acids) and pharmacologically useful compounds.

Results
Indium powder in water is shown to act as a very efficient catalyst for one-pot, three-component synthesis of α-aminonitriles from diverse amines, aldehydes and TMSCN. This general rapid method is applicable to a wide range of amines and aldehydes and produces products in excellent yield.

Conclusions
The present one-pot, three-component environmentally benign procedure for the synthesis of α-aminonitriles will find application in the synthesis of complex biologically active molecules.

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A rapid, convenient, solventless green approach for the synthesis of oximes using grindstone chemistry

Green Chemistry International

A rapid, convenient, solventless green approach for the synthesis of oximes using grindstone chemistry
Lakhinath Saikia, Jejiron Baruah, Ashim Thakur
Organic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters 2011, 1:12 (4 October 2011)

http://www.orgmedchemlett.com/content/1/1/12

Background
Synthesis of oximes is an important reaction in organic chemistry, because these versatile oximes are used for protection, purification, and characterization of carbonyl compounds. Nitriles, amides via Beckmann rearrangement, nitro compounds, nitrones, amines, and azaheterocycles can be synthesised from oximes. They also find applications for selective α-activation. In inorganic chemistry, oximes act as a versatile ligand.

Several procedures for the preparation of oximes exist, but, most of them have not addressed the green chemistry issue. They are associated with generation of pollutants, requirement of high reaction temperature, low yields, lack of a generalized procedure, etc. Hence, there is a demand for developing an efficient, convenient, and non-polluting or less polluting alternative method for the preparation of oximes. In…

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Syrris announces use of systems in polyketide flow total synthesis

SynthFlow

Fresh out of the Ley group: use of the Syrris system for a strategy in polyketide natural product synthesis, mostly under continuous flow conditions. Highlighted in the paper in providing flow routes to Spirangien and Spirodienal are discussions of efficient mixing, capability of pumping low-boiling solvents and effective quenching techniques (Angew Chemie 2014).

Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 8.24.57 AM

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Dr Andrew L. Lawrence…..Excellent chemistry at work

Lawrence group reaction mechanism

 

http://www.chem.ed.ac.uk/staff/academic-staff/dr-andrew-l-lawrence

organic chemistry research group based at the School of Chemistry at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

Dr Andrew L. Lawrence

Dr Andrew L. Lawrence
Lecturer in Organic Chemistry
Room 217

University of Edinburgh
Joseph Black Building
David Brewster Road
Edinburgh
EH9 3FJ

0131 650 4831

Research Interests:
Total Synthesis of Natural Products, Biomimetic Chemistry, Domino Reactions

Our group does research in the area of natural product synthesis and the development of synthetic methodology. The aim of our research is to use nature as a source of inspiration and direction to improve and develop synthetic organic chemistry. Evolution has resulted in the highly efficient biosynthetic chemical pathways observed within living organisms. In our research we aim to harness the power of evolution by mimicking these chemical pathways.

This biomimetic approach to organic synthesis leads to a deeper understanding of how nature operates and illuminates the potential of new chemical reactions. Our biomimetic approach towards organic chemistry is primarily focused upon the synthesis of complex and biologically important natural products. When choosing our target natural products we are drawn to compounds that have extraordinary biosynthetic origins, complex molecular architectures and potent or novel biological/medicinal profiles.

Lawrence group reaction mechanism

We proposed that the unique and complex structure of the kingianin family of natural products was formed in nature through a spectacular radical cation formal Diels-Alder dimerization. We have recently completed a total synthesis of kingianins A, D and F in just ten steps following a strategy inspired by this biosynthetic speculation.

Lawrence research image

Certain phenylethanoid dimers and pseudo-dimers are assembled in nature through elegant sequences of nucleophilic addition reactions (Michael, aldol, Mannich reactions, etc.). We recently accomplished a total synthesis of incarvilleatone via a key biomimetic oxa-Michael/Michael/aldol reaction sequence.

Publications:

Total Synthesis and Structural Revision of the Alkaloid Incargranine B. Brown, P. D.; Willis, A. C.; Sherburn, M. S.; Lawrence, A. L.* Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 201352, 13273-13275.

Total Synthesis of Kingianins A, D and F. Drew, S. L.; Sherburn, M. S.; Lawrence, A. L. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013, 52, 4221-4224.

Total Synthesis of Incarviditone and Incarvilleatone. Brown, P. D.; Willis, A. C.; Sherburn, M. S.; Lawrence, A. L.* Org. Lett. 2012, 14, 4537-4539.

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